Used R. Taylor Style 1 (2006)

Used R. Taylor Style 1 (2006)

Cedar & Mahogany
1-3/4" Nut • 25-1/2" Scale

Regular price $2,495 Sale #48

Sold

R. Taylor was Bob Taylor's line of ultra high-end acoustic guitars. Currently, there are no new R. Taylor guitars in production.

Pristine, like-new condition. No nicks, dings, or scratches of any kind. 

Plays beautifully. Frets at 95%.

The guitar's unique combination of cedar and mahogany give it a rich, silky tone with amazing warmth and clarity. This guitar is unlike any Taylor we've heard!

Built in 2006. Serial number 46.

Includes deluxe Armitage hardshell case.

Grand Symphony Body Size

This strong Taylor strummer produces a rich, bold voice.

Body Length: 20" / Body Width: 16-1/4" / Body Depth: 4-5/8"

  • Designed by Bob Taylor in 2006
  • Rich, piano-like bass, strong midrange, and thick trebles
  • Strong volume when strumming or flatpicking, and responsive clarity with a light attack

The Grand Symphony shape joined the line in 2006 and delivers a rich, powerful acoustic voice. Think of it as a Grand Auditorium with a turbo boost, thanks to expanded physical dimensions, including a slightly wider waist and a bigger lower bout.

Strummers and pickers with a driving attack will love the fullness, volume and sustain. Yet for such a robust voice, the GS is also clear and responsive to fast picking runs or a light fingerstyle touch, so if you’re a dynamic player, this shape is a true contender.

The big voice doesn’t come at the expense of balance. The piano-like bass, meaty midrange, and thick, shimmering highs blend seamlessly. These traits also make the GS a great vehicle for 12-Strings. If you like a lush, potent guitar tone that has the horsepower to compete with other acoustic cannons out there, the GS shape is a worthy choice.

With a slightly larger footprint than the Grand Auditorium, the GS yields a slightly more potent and dynamic all-around sound. Players can expect deeper bass, thicker trebles, and increased volume and low-end sustain, all without disrupting the tonal balance and clarity of the guitar.

Cedar Top

A true performer for those with a lighter touch, cedar tops yield extra warmth and pair nicely with mahogany and rosewood.

Origin: Western North America

Cedar is less dense than spruce, and that softness typically translates into a sense of sonic warmth. If Sitka has a full dynamic range, cedar makes quieter tones louder, but it also imposes more of a ceiling on high volume levels driven by an aggressive attack.

If one tries to drive a cedar top hard, at a certain point it will reach a volume limit. Typically, players with a lighter touch sound wonderful on a cedar-top guitar, fingerstyle players especially — that lighter touch will be amplified a little more, and one's attack never reaches the ceiling. Flatpickers are likely to hit the ceiling fast, and might be frustrated by an inability to get the tonal output to match their attack.

Cedar's color can range from lighter to darker.

Goes Well With: Fingerstylists, players with a lighter touch, mahogany and rosewood GA, GS and GC bodies.

Mahogany Back & Sides

Mahogany is known for its meaty midrange character, featuring a strong fundamental focus often described as “punchy,” “woody,” or “dry,” because it doesn’t produce a lot of ringing overtones. Mahogany’s earthy voice has been featured on many roots music recordings over the years.

Origin: Central and South America

Used On: The 500 Series, Acoustic 5 Series, LKSM

Mahogany is a good wood to anchor a discussion of tones, as a lot of other wood tones can be described in relation to it.

Its essential sonic profile is well represented in the midrange frequencies. Acoustic guitars in general tend to live in the midrange portion of the sound spectrum, but mahogany in particular displays a lot of midrange character.

That thick, present midrange sound is sometimes described in guitar circles as meaty, organic or even "chewy" wherever a player digs in on the fretboard, they're tapping into the core of the harmonic content of what a guitar produces.

Those great midrange frequencies produce overtones that stack up and produce bloom, giving the sound extra girth. When one hears the resulting harmonics, the "chewy" tone serves up a big mouthful of midrange. As a popular tonewood for many decades, mahogany has been used on scads of old school acoustic recordings, and that sonic heritage carries across various strains of roots music, from blues to folk to slack key.

Goes Well With: A broad range of players and musical styles; people who like a well-balanced tone, nice dynamic range and a healthy serving of overtones.

Blues and other rootsy players tend to respond well to mahogany's midrange character. A smaller body mahogany guitar (GC or GA) might appeal to fingerstyle players, whereas more aggressive flatpickers might opt for a mahogany Dreadnought or GS.

For versatility, a mahogany GA is a good bet. Because of mahogany’s midrange, a player with"dark hands" will tend to sound darker on a mahogany guitar. A bright player will sound slightly less bright.

Body SizeGrand Symphony (GS)
Top WoodCedar
Back & SidesMahogany
FingerboardEbony
Nut Width1-3/4"
Scale Length25-1/2"
String Spacing2-3/16"
CaseDeluxe Ameritage Hardshel Case